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Exploring Roseburg Oregon: Umpqua Valley Festival of Lights

by Mary Gilbert


Sunday, Nov 24, 2019 at 5:30pm

River Forks Park
380 River Forks Road
Roseburg, OR 97471

Event Website

JOIN US FOR THE UMPQUA VALLEY’S FAVORITE HOLIDAY TRADITION!

The Festival of Lights has become an annual tradition in Douglas County, drawing 25,000 visitors per year and generating hundreds of thousands of dollars for Rotary Club scholarships and service projects since 1993.

​For just $10 per car, visitors enjoy 90 light displays containing nearly 500,000 lights and all the traditional attractions that have made the Festival famous, including the Holiday Village, wagon rides, the World’s Largest Nutcracker and visits from Santa Claus himself!

​The Holiday Village is open Thursday through Sunday evenings through Christmas Eve in Helleck Hall. With Santa Claus, a model train set, cookies, candies, warm cider and souvenirs for sale, the Holiday Village is a must see.

Wagon rides are offered Thursday through Sunday nights for $5.

Courtesy of The Mary Gilbert Group

Photo Credit: nrtoday.com

Outdoor Turkey Frying: Tips and Tricks

by Mary Gilbert


Thanksgiving is on its way, and for most of us, that means turkey. In recent years, fried turkey has grown significantly in popularity; this has led to a lot more people deciding to pick up a large fryer and try their hand at frying their own at home. Unfortunately, this has led to a sharp increase in fryer-related accidents as well. Nothing can ruin a Thanksgiving faster than fryer incidents that result in burns, fires or other serious problems.

 

To that end, let’s look at a few ways to keep your turkey-frying adventures safe. Whether you’re a first-time fryer or a seasoned turkey-frying pro, here are some things to keep in mind to help keep your holiday safe.
 

Picking the Right Fryer

There are a few different options available when it comes to turkey fryers. You can opt for a propane fryer that heats with a burner or an electric fryer that you need to plug in. Regardless of the option you choose, make sure that it has temperature controls so that you can keep the oil below its smoke point. One of the big causes of fires at Thanksgiving is that people turn turkey fryers up too high and the oil starts to burn.
 

Proper Turkey Preparation

While everyone loves the thought of a big juicy turkey as a centerpiece, if you’re frying a turkey, you’re better off going with a smaller bird. Ideally you should opt for a turkey that’s no more than 8 to 10 pounds, or 12 pounds at the upper limit. While fryers can typically handle more than this, bigger birds are more likely to cause oil spills as you put them into the fryer pot. Make sure that frozen turkeys are completely thawed and patted dry and avoid using any water-based marinades to season the bird. Dry brining or other dry rubs are best when prepping your turkey.
 

Choosing the Right Location

Make sure that your fryer is on a flat, level and solid surface before filling it with oil. Don’t place the fryer on a deck, porch or other area where the surface underneath could shift or shake as people walk by. Don’t place the fryer under trees, near piles of leaves or around other flammable materials. If possible, place the fryer in a place that doesn’t get much foot traffic and where you can easily keep children and pets away.
 

Watch the Weather

Rain, snow and other inclement weather can cause major problems with turkey fryers, so only fry a turkey outside if the weather will be nice for the entire time that the fryer is hot. If you have a covered carport or garage then this may be a safe place to fry the turkey provided that it can’t be affected by heavy winds or other weather problems.
 

Be Safe While Frying

Wear eye protection, heat-protectant gloves and long sleeves while around the fryer. Always place the turkey into the oil slowly, don’t just drop it in. If using propane, turn the burner off before placing the turkey in the oil and then turn it back on once the risk of splashes or spills is over. Make sure that somebody is watching the fryer at all times, even if everything seems to be going well.

 

Contact The Mary Gilbert Group for ALL your real estate needs! 541.371.5500 or [email protected] 

 

By: Homekeepr, David Weinstein

199 NE Plum Ridge Drive: Newer 4 Bedroom Winston Home!

by Mary Gilbert

Roseburg OR Real Estate For Sale 
199 NE Plum Ridge Drive, Winston, OR  97496

Handyman Special! Come finish what the seller has started. This newer home will make a great “Home Sweet Home” with 4 generously sized bedrooms and 2.5 bathrooms in the family friendly neighborhood of Plum Ridge! The cozy great room opens to the eat in kitchen creating an open layout on the main level ideal for entertaining and daily function. Abundant cabinet and counterspace including a breakfast bar provides tons of room for meal prep. Sliding doors off the dining area open to the rear deck perfect for BBQs. The fenced yard offers plenty of room to run and play, garden or to just kick back and relax! Appreciate plenty of parking and vehicle storage in the attached 2 car garage and driveway. Move right in and add your own personal touches and updates along the way.

Mary Gilbert, Licensed Realtor in Oregon has distinguished herself as a leader in the Roseburg OR real estate market. Mary assists buyers looking for Roseburg OR real estate for sale and aggressively markets Roseburg OR homes for sale. 

Mary, Licensed Realtor in Oregon brings with her a keen eye for the details of buying or selling a Roseburg OR home and seemingly boundless determination and energy, which is why her clients benefit from her unique brand of real estate service. Rooted in Tradition, Focused on the Future –Mary Gilbert of Keller Williams Realty Umpqua Valley will help make the most of your Roseburg OR real estate experience. Give her a call today, 541-371-5500, and discover the difference she can make during your family's move.

Millennials Buying Homes: What’s Trending?

by Mary Gilbert


Though there are a number of stereotypes surrounding Millennials, they actually make up a fairly significant part of the economy. More importantly, their economic strength as a group seems to be growing by the day. As of 2019, Millennials make up approximately 37 percent of home buyers… that’s a bigger share than any other generation, including Baby Boomers! So what exactly are these Millennials buying, and what trends are growing along with their increasing representation in the market? Let’s take a closer look and find out.

 

First-Time Buyers

Approximately 52 percent of Millennials who are buying homes are first-time home buyers. This makes sense for younger Millennials, but even older Millennials who were born in the 80s still see a significant number of first-time buyers. Before buying, a large number of these Millennials were renting homes. By buying homes, they can enjoy the benefits of ownership and build equity for similar amounts (or in some cases, less) than they were paying each month in rent previously.
 

Family Homes

The majority of home-buying Millennials are buying single-family homes. This is in part because over 50 percent of them are either married or in long-term relationships; in fact, in 2018 there were more married couples among home-buying Millennials than there were in any other generational group that was in the market for a house. A significant number of Millennials also have children under the age of 18 living at home, further increasing the need for a family-friendly home.
 

Motivation to Buy

The majority of Millennials who have bought homes within the last year did so simply because they wanted to own a home of their own. Some wanted to own a larger home, be closer to friends and family or were moving due to job relocation, but the general desire to own a home was listed as a reason for buying by as many Millennials as ones that gave all other reasons combined. A lot of this came down to the opportunities that were present as well; over 50 percent of Millennials report that it was “just the right time” to buy a home, while the second most common reason (that they didn’t have much choice and had to buy when they did) was only reported by around 10 to 15 percent of Millennials.
 

Back to the Suburbs

One big trend among Millennial home buyers is that they were buying homes in the suburbs. This wasn’t restricted only to Millennials, either; 51 percent of all homes purchased in 2018 were located in suburban areas or subdivisions. The Millennials fell pretty close to this statistic, with small towns being the second most common location. A vast majority of these homes were previously owned; though there have been a number of new subdivisions built around the country in recent years, only a small percentage of Millennials are buying into them.
 

Biggest Factors

There are a number of factors that affected the purchasing decisions of Millennials. The presence of public transit or proximity to work was one major factor, with many Millennials trying to minimize commuting costs. Heating and cooling efficiency also played an important role. In general, Millennials were more willing to compromise on price than on a home’s condition, but only around 20 percent were willing to compromise on the distance of their new home from work.
 

Home Shopping Trends

By far, the majority of Millennials started their home search by looking online to try and find properties for sale. Around 15 percent spent even more time online than that, starting their search by researching the ins and outs of the home buying process before even starting to look at properties. Beyond online sources, Millennials trusted real estate agents and Realtors the most for information about homes for sale. The entire process took about 10 weeks on average before finding the home they wanted to buy, though a real estate agent was involved for the last 7 or so weeks of the search.
 

In the Market?

Are you a Millennial in the market for a new home? You’re in luck, the experts with The Mary Gilbert Group can help you get into the home of your dreams. 541.371.5500 or [email protected] 

 

By: Homekeepr, Rob Morelli

Popular House Styles Defined

by Mary Gilbert


When you’re new to house-hunting and begin reading house descriptions, you may not understand the difference in a ranch, Tudor or a Craftsman style.  These eight most common architectural types will help you not feel so overwhelmed while going through your
 to-see list: 

 

  • Popular in the 1930s was the Arts and Crafts, or Craftsman, house.  Known by their low-pitched roof, front porch with tapered columns, the interiors of this type of home features lots of woodwork and built ins. 
     

  • Cape Cod-style homes are rectangular in shape, usually with the front door in the center of the front of the home, shuttered windows on either side of the front door and gable ends.  Traditional structures are one and a half stories, with living, sleeping and dining rooms all divided with walls. 
     
     

  • Colonial houses are the predecessor of the Cape Cod, and they are similar in shape, style, and interior.  The biggest difference between the two is the Colonial’s second story was a full story, versus the Cape Cod’s half-story.
      
     

  • A home that is described as Contemporary should be just that--a house of “now.”  Think of a contemporary home as having Colonial, Ranch or other architectural characteristics, just with an updated look. 
     

  • As times changed during the 1930s-60s, Mid-Century Modern-style houses began to make an impression using sleek straight lines, asymmetrical form and basic materials like glass, concrete, and metal.   
     

  • Ranch-style homes were a popular architectural style in the US during the post-World War II years through the 1970s.  The one-story form was usually low on the ground, with mixed exterior siding and attached garage.  
     

  • Looking like something from a fairy tale, Tudor homes featured curved rooflines and doorways, timbered or half-timbered gables filled with mason work or shingles, decorated windows, and cross-gables on the front exterior.  
     

  • The Victorian era brought romance and frills, and the homes of that period are no different.  A Victorian-style home will normally have a steeped-pitch roof, gabled windows, decorative woodwork, bay windows, and wide front porch.  

 

REALTOR® Magazine offers a guide to many other house styles, complete with images of the basic look of each type and brief description.  Once you’re familiar with these terms and the houses they describe, you’ll feel more confident as you search listings, looking for your new home. 
 

Contact the experts on The Mary Gilbert Group for all your Real Estate needs! 541.371.5500 or [email protected] 

Photo credit: popsugar

Exploring Roseburg Oregon: FREE Self-Defense Seminar

by Mary Gilbert


November 16, 2019 – 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM

Dynamic Martial Arts
1223 NE Cedar Street
Roseburg, OR 97470

Our last event (October 20th) was full to capacity and we have many people that wished to attend but were unable but were unable. Due to this, we are only accepting first time visitors for this event.

Human Trafficking and the threat of kidnapping are real! Please join us for this FREE event and learn mental strategies and physical skills to protect yourself from potential attackers.

At Dynamic Martial Arts, our Jiu-jitsu is a combative system that utilizes use of structure and leverage to overcome a larger, stronger attacker. This class is ideal for anyone that would like to learn basic and practical methods of self-defense and abduction prevention.

Reserve Your Spot Here

Courtesy of The Mary Gilbert Group

Home Shopping Red Flags to Watch

by Mary Gilbert


Shopping for a home can be exciting. Unfortunately, sometimes we can get too caught up in the excitement and end up ignoring signs that the house we’re looking at might not be the best option. There are a number of red flags that can pop up when looking at homes, and even more when shopping for a mortgage to pay for the home you choose. To help you avoid having a bad home-buying experience, here are a few of the biggest red flags that you should keep an eye out for.

 

Signs of Foundation Trouble

When looking at a home, be sure to get a look around the outside so you can catch a peek near the foundation. If the home has a basement, ask to see it as well. While a little settling is normal, if you see large cracks, signs of leaks or other indications that there is foundation damage then buying this home is just asking for trouble.
 

Insect Issues

Having insects or other pests in your home is more than just unsanitary: These uninvited intruders can actually damage your home and lead to costly repairs. If you see insects, mice or other pests (or indications that they’ve been in the house recently), it could indicate a pest control problem that the seller has been unable to get under control. Depending on how bad the problem is, this could be a deal-breaker.
 

Inconsistently Fresh Paint

Seeing freshly painted walls in a house is pretty common and usually isn’t anything to worry about. When the paint only covers certain patches of the wall, though, that’s a different story. Be sure to ask about any small sections of paint that you see as they may indicate damage that was hastily covered up with a little bit of paint. It’s possible that there’s a good reason for it, but that little patch of paint may also be hiding an unpleasant surprise in the wall.
 

Smells and Stains

Most sellers go out of their way to make a house appear at its very best before letting potential buyers come in. This is why you should definitely take note of any odd smells or stains that you encounter in the house. Smells could indicate leaks, mildew, mold or other problems hiding somewhere in the house. Stains can also indicate leaks and other problems, especially if they appear on the ceiling or near the tops of the walls. Large stains on the ceiling can even signify a leaky roof!
 

Outlet Issues

When looking through a house, be sure to spare electrical outlets a glance. If they have visible cracks, discolorations or black smudges on them then you may have electrical problems in your future! While you’re thinking about the electricity, you should also ask to see the breaker box to make sure that it’s well organized and that all of the breakers appear to be in working order.
 

Standing Water

If it’s been raining, you may see a little bit of water standing in the yard when you go to visit a house. This isn’t necessarily an issue, but stop to think about how long it’s been since it rained and just how much rain you’ve gotten. If there seems to be a lot of water for the amount of rain or if it’s been a while since the last rainfall, that standing water could indicate drainage issues or even problems with a water line or septic tank.
 

Loan Issues

Even if there’s nothing wrong with the house you want to buy, you may encounter red flags during the loan process. Higher than usual interest rates, requirements for additional insurance or flood insurance, added costs and other quirks could mean that you need to find a new lender… or they could mean that there are issues with the property that you missed. Shop around for a better loan if you think you can find a better deal, though keep an eye out for issues that keep popping up at multiple lenders.
 

The Best Way to Avoid Red Flags

If you’re seeing red flags everywhere you look and aren’t sure where to turn, we can help. Contact The Mary Gilbert Group to help guide you through finding a great home AND a great loan. Reach us at 541.371.5500 or [email protected] 

 

By: Homekeepr, Saro Cutri

Home Programs Vets Should Know About

by Mary Gilbert


Veterans sacrifice a lot for this country. To help honor these sacrifices, special programs were put in place to aid vets in getting and keeping a home. Unfortunately, not all veterans know that these programs exist. Even for those who do, they may not realize exactly what options are available for them and may apply for a program that doesn’t really match their situation ideally.

 

To help sort out some of the confusion, here are a few of the most common home programs that vets might be interested in. As requirements and availability can change over time, be sure to find out more before attempting to apply for any specific program.
 

VA Home Loans

One of the most commonly used home programs for vets are VA home loans. These loans are subsidized by the Veterans Administration itself, similar to HUD home loans or rural loans subsidized by the Department of Agriculture. Thanks to the VA subsidy, vets can qualify for better-than-average interest rates and may be able to reduce or eliminate down payments or closing costs as well. Houses must meet the livability requirements of the VA to be purchased with a VA home loan.
 

VA Foreclosure Programs

Another useful home program for vets is the VA foreclosure program. This features homes that have been foreclosed upon that meet livability requirements, allowing vets to buy the homes at a discount from their market value. This lower price can make VA loans even more affordable since there is less to repay from the start.
 

Loan Forbearance

One problem that vets sometimes face is getting behind on mortgage payments and running the risk of losing their home. The VA offers loan forbearance programs that can help with this. While this doesn’t serve as loan forgiveness, the forbearance does temporarily stop repayments to give veterans more time to catch up. There are no penalties accrued during the forbearance period – and pending foreclosures won’t move forward while the loan is in forbearance. Once the forbearance period ends, the vet can begin making payments again at their normal rate.
 

Loan Modifications

VA-backed loan modifications are another option for vets that are struggling with their mortgage payment. These modifications can make changes to the interest rate, interest type or even the repayment period of the loan to reduce the amount of the monthly payment. There are a few different types of loan modifications available for vets ranging from basic loan refinancing to specialized repayment plans designed to keep vets in their homes when times are tough. The specific terms of the modification will depend on the specific program or plan that the veteran uses to modify their loan.
 

In-Home Care Programs

For veterans who were injured in service or who experience other chronic health issues, the VA offers programs to aid in getting in-home care. These programs pay out directly to the care provider and may also cover the cost of specialized care equipment or home modifications that are necessary to help the vets get through their day. These programs may be a good option for injured vets who need minor remodeling for medical reasons but who are unable to get it done on a fixed income.
 

VA Disability Status

It is important to point out that some VA programs require a veteran to have disability status before they can qualify. Disability through the VA can take a while to certify, so vets who have ongoing mobility or health issues should apply early before applying for other programs. Some programs may have options available while a disability decision is still pending, but there are at least a few VA programs that can’t do anything for you unless you’re already certified as disabled by the VA.
 

Finding the Right Program

If you’re struggling to navigate the complexities of some of these programs, there are mortgage and loan experts out there who can help you. They have experience dealing with VA programs and may be able to advise you on which programs are best for your situation. Contact The Mary Gilbert Group for advice and a referral! 541.371.5500 or [email protected] 

 

By: Homekeepr, David Weinstein

Happy Veteran's Day!

by Mary Gilbert

Prepping Your Fireplace

by Mary Gilbert


On a cool evening, there’s almost nothing better than sitting by the warmth of a fire with a cup of cocoa.  If you’re a new homeowner who is new to having a fireplace or woodstove, you may be a bit apprehensive about using it.  There are some things you sh
ould know before you fire it up, and this guide will give you the confidence to use this feature during the cold months. 

 

  • - Call a pro to inspect and clean your chimney before using it, especially if this is your first Winter in the house. 
     

  • - Check the damper to be sure it opens and closes properly, and make sure the doors are secure, as well as being certain the glass isn’t loose and has no cracks. 
     

  • - Examine a woodstove’s chimney pipe for any loose sections and clean any accumulated soot or ashes.  The door should open easily, close very tight, and the handle should lock into place once the door is shut. 
     

  • - When purchasing a mat or rug to place in front of the hearth, be certain it’s certified fireproof. 

  • Wood shouldn’t be brought inside until it’s ready for use.  Find out why you should keep it outside and other great tips about storing firewood here. 
     

  • - Gas fireplaces require a little less maintenance, but it’s important to be familiar with the operation.  If you can’t find an owner’s manual for your type of fireplace, see if online editions are available, or call the company to have one mailed to you. 
     

  • - If you see dust and cobwebs, turn off the gas off, and vacuum using the hose attachment. 

  • Ceramic logs or lava rocks inside a gas fireplace may need sprucing up as well. How to Clean Stuff.net guides us through this process in a few simple steps. 
     

  • - Soot can collect on the glass doors, and it’s best to keep them clean.  When the doors are cool, spray them with window cleaner, (have newspaper or old towels under them to catch dripping grime), and use a cleaning brush or crumpled newspaper to remove as much of the soot as possible.  Follow up with a soft cloth dampened with clean warm water to remove any film left behind.   

 

If you’re even the slightest bit unsure about prepping your fireplace, don’t hesitate to call a professional!  Many specialty stores know who you should contact and may even have a technician available.  Not only do you want to stay warm, you want your home safe. 
 

Contact the experts on The Mary Gilbert Group for all your Real Estate needs! 541.371.5500 or [email protected] 

Photo credit: telegraph.co.uk

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Mary Gilbert
Keller Williams Realty Umpqua Valley
2365 NW Kline Street, Suite 201
Roseburg OR 97471
541-371-5500
Fax: 541-371-5501

© Keller Williams Realty, Inc. is a real estate franchise company. Each Keller Williams office is independently owned and operated. Keller Williams Realty, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer and supports the Fair Housing Act.